Coralizing the web

Coral is a seamless transparent system for distributing HTTP traffic over a set of web cache proxies to reduce bandwidth demand on a central resource.
What? What the hell does that mean?
Stops your server going down under the weight of a Slashdotting, dude.
Really? That’s cool. How does that work, then?
Easy. Take the URL that you want to not get Slashdotted: let’s say it’s http://www.example.com/something/cool. Then add nyud.net:8090 at the end of the hostname, like so: http://www.example.com.nyud.net:8090/something/cool. That’s the URL you give to people. Now, when someone requests it, the content at that URL will get transparently given to them from one of Coral’s many caches, instead of from your server.
Neatness! How many caches are there?
This is unclear. The website makes reference to people running Coral caches, but doesn’t seem to say whether anyone is actually doing so.
Nonetheless, that’s smart. Hey, I’ve got an idea! Why not use this for LugRadio?
I was just thinking about that. Of course, we already have the mirror network. Moreover, Coral won’t let you serve files more than 50MB: LR shows aren’t that big, but they might reduce it still further. It’s a pretty cool idea, though. It would be most handy if Slashdot themselves Coralized the URLs they post, which would stop anyone getting Slashdotted (or would help, at least).
Ooh, good idea? Do you think they’ll do that?
Hell, no. But it would be good. Would have saved my website when I got slashdotted, for example.

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