Tomato catchup

Blimey, I go away for a day and a half and loads happens.

Elcomsoft and Dmitry Skylarov are innocent (via everybody). The jurors said, “Under the eBook formats, you have no rights at all, and the jury had trouble with that concept”. This reaffirms my belief that ordinary people, which is what a jury is, don’t like rights being taken away and see it as a bad thing. Excellent.

Dave Farquhar is debating shifting to a different blogging system. I wish Vellum was done so I could recommend it to him.

The difference between content and attributes, or why you should put some stuff in a tag and some stuff between tags, by mpt. I never really knew why you should store some data in one place and some in another, and this is a really useful point he’s made.

Mark talks about moving friends to cold storage — having a mail folder called “Friends” and moving people from there to their own folder (good) or to cold storage (bad). I don’t think I could do that; it’d be too stressful to have to categorise the people I know into “indiscriminate friends”, “friends worthy of their own folder”, and “people who used to be friends”. So I essentially do the same thing, but manually and in my head every time; categorising these things explicitly would make it real.

Signs for librarians (via trainedmonkey): the FBI can now monitor the US public’s use of the internet using library facilities, and the libraries can’t tell them. These signs take much the same route that was taken by some people after the UK’s Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act: you put up a prominent notice saying “this data hasn’t been seen by the government” and then warn people to watch for the removal of the notice. Or just caution people that their viewing habits may be being monitored and to act accordingly, but that’s a less elegant solution.

Zaurus Doom (via Sarabian). Something else for me to do in meetings other than read ebooks, then.

Creative Commons License The contents of this weblog are licensed under a Creative Commons License. This boils down to, “the licensor permits others to copy, distribute, display, and perform the work. In return, licensees must give the original author credit.”

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