Back in the habit

So, I go away on holiday and lots happens, including Netscape going belly up. Oof. Anyway, a random selection of stuff. Oh, and I had an idea for something that could replace RSS syndication altogether, but I’m still working on the idea in my head so that it doesn’t get immediately shot down. :) On with the linking:

  • Aquarion’s got a job. Clearly “ability to spell ‘opportunity’” wasn’t on the test ;) Congratulations are due, especially since he seems to be working for someone who sounds interesting (although, I have to say, a little vaporous…)
  • The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen! A film! Yay! Given [From Hell][], does this mark a new trend for filming of Alan Moore stuff? If I grovel pathetically, can we have Watchmen? Although I fear that it would be ruined by being filmed, especially given how Tom Sawyer is suddenly in the LXG in case American audiences didn’t like it.
  • Richard Allen, one of the blogging MPs, had an idea that we should adopt an MP and teach them about weblogs, and [people I listen to][] keep mentioning it, so I may have to try and attend one of my MP’s surgeries.
  • This CSS top menu (via Solitude) is vaguely cool in a Mac OS X sort of way.
  • Greg Costikyan talks about IP law from the creator’s perspective, and defends the idea that “IP law good, corporate highjacking thereof at the expense of artists morally dubious, but piracy clearly bad” with some aplomb. More to the point, he states that, in reference to the putative law that uploading a single copyrighted file makes you a felon, “the problem with this kind of thing is that contemptible laws breed contempt for the law”. This point was also made by Daniel Davies over at D-Squared Digest, when he said (at the bottom of the page) that “copying is theft, theft is sin, sin is forgiven, so get stuck in.”, continuing with the justification that “in other words, the fact that copyright law means that upstanding citizens are committing theft by sharing their music, is a good thing about theft, not a bad thing about the law”, and finishing with the not-untenable position that “a sensible copyright law could not be drafted in any other way, and nobody should be expected to obey the law that we have.” Pragmatism going hand-in-hand with rebellion, perhaps?
  • Germany has implemented the EUCD (via Danny), with the additional even-more-onerous condition that discussion of copy-protection circumvention methods is now illegal in that country.